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Sales Introduction Emails: Best Practices, Tips, and Examples

RepVue Editorial Team
RepVue Editorial TeamDec 28, 2023

It’s not uncommon for salespeople to struggle to get in the door with new prospects. Many people will send out hundreds — sometimes thousands — of emails with little to no response. Crafting a successful sales introduction email can be a daunting task. But with these best practices, tips, and examples for writing a compelling sales introduction email, you’ll grab your prospect’s attention and increase your chances of closing a deal.

First Things First: Research Your Prospect

The first step in crafting a successful sales introduction email is to research your prospect. Take the time to understand their needs, pain points, and goals. This will allow you to tailor your message to their specific situation, showing that you understand their unique challenges and can provide valuable solutions. For example, if you’re reaching out to a marketing director, you might want to highlight how your product or service can help them increase their ROI or streamline their workflow.

Once you’ve done your research, it’s time to craft your message. 

Crafting Your Subject Line

Your prospect is likely receiving dozens, if not hundreds, of emails per day. You need to make sure your email stands out from the crowd. A well-crafted subject line can make all the difference in whether or not your email gets opened and read. 

Here are some tips to help you create a subject line that stands out.

Check out our guide to sales email subject lines

Personalization

In order to catch the recipient’s attention and get opened, personalization is key.. Including the recipient’s name in the subject line can be a great way to personalize the email. For example, “John, introducing our new product line” is more likely to be opened than “Introducing our new product line.”

Another way to personalize the subject line is to reference something specific about the recipient or their company. For example, “Saw your recent blog post and thought you might be interested in our product” shows that you’ve done your research and are reaching out with something relevant to the recipient.

Clarity and Brevity

Your subject line should be clear and to the point. Avoid using vague or overly clever subject lines that might confuse the recipient. Instead, clearly state the purpose of your email in the subject line. For example, “Introducing our new product line” or “Quick question about your marketing strategy” are clear and concise subject lines that get to the point.

Additionally, keep your subject line short and sweet. Most email clients cut off subject lines after a certain number of characters, so make sure your subject line is brief enough to be fully displayed. Nine words or 60 characters should be the maximum length. 

Creating Urgency

Creating a sense of urgency in your subject line can be a powerful motivator for the recipient to open your email. For example: 

“Limited-time offer: 20% off our new product line” creates a sense of urgency and encourages the recipient to act quickly.

Another way to create urgency is to use time-sensitive language in your subject line. For example, “Last chance to register for our upcoming webinar” or “Have you budget for [solution] this year?” both create a sense of urgency and encourage the recipient to take action.

By following these best practices for crafting your subject line, you can increase the chances that your sales introduction email will be opened and read by the recipient.

Opening Lines

The opening line is crucial. It’s the first thing your recipient will read, and it sets the tone for the rest of the email. In this section, we’ll discuss the best practices for writing effective opening lines that will grab your recipient’s attention and encourage them to keep reading.

Building Rapport

One of the most effective ways to start a sales introduction email is by building rapport with your recipient. This can be achieved by referencing something you have in common or something you know about them. For example, you could mention a mutual connection, a recent event in their industry, or a blog post they wrote that you found interesting.

Here’s an example: 

“Hey [Recipient],

I came across your blog post on [topic] and I thought it was really insightful. I love how you shared a new perspective on [X] “

By starting off with a compliment and a common interest, you’re more likely to establish a positive rapport with your recipient and encourage them to keep reading.

Relevance to Recipient

Another effective way to start a sales introduction email is by highlighting the relevance of your product or service to your recipient. This can be achieved by referencing a pain point or a specific challenge that your recipient is facing, and then explaining how your product or service can help solve that problem.

For example: 

“Hey [Recipient],

I noticed that your company is struggling with [problem]. Our product/service has helped other companies in your industry solve this problem, and I think it could be a great fit for your company as well.”

By highlighting the relevance of your product or service to your recipient, you’re more likely to grab their attention and encourage them to keep reading.

In summary, when writing a sales introduction email, it’s important to focus on building rapport and highlighting the relevance of your product or service to your recipient. By following these best practices, you’ll be able to write effective opening lines that will grab your recipient’s attention and encourage them to keep reading.

Highlighting the Value Proposition

In a sales introduction email, highlighting the value proposition is crucial. You want to make sure that the recipient understands the benefits of your product or service and what sets it apart from the competition.

One effective way to highlight the value proposition is to use a table or a list to clearly outline the features and benefits of your product or service. For example, you could create a table that lists the key features of your product in one column and the corresponding benefits in another column. This makes it easy for the recipient to quickly understand the value of your product.

Another way to highlight the value proposition is to use strong, persuasive language. However, be careful not to make exaggerated or false claims. You want to be persuasive, but also honest and transparent.

For example, instead of saying “our product is the best on the market,” you could say: 

“Our product has been rated as one of the top performers in its category by independent reviewers.” This statement conveys the value of your product without making an exaggerated claim.

Of course, this part of the introduction email will be difficult in a sales organization without a unique value proposition or strong product-market fit. If you’re struggling to convey the value of your product, ask other sellers in your organization how they approach it. Most sales reps are happy to share what they’ve found that works.

How do reps rate your org for product-market fit? Find out here.

Call to Action

After introducing yourself and explaining your value proposition, the next step is to include a clear call-to-action (CTA) in your sales introduction email. A CTA is a directive that tells the recipient what action to take next.

Specificity

The more specific your CTA is, the more likely the recipient is to take action. Instead of a generic “contact me if you’re interested,” provide a clear and specific next step. For example, “Click the link below to schedule a 15-minute call with me to discuss your specific needs.” This tells the recipient exactly what to do and what to expect.

Ease of Response

Make it as easy as possible for the recipient to respond to your CTA. If you’re asking them to schedule a call, provide a link to your calendar or a few specific time slots to choose from. If you’re asking them to provide information, make sure the form is easy to fill out and submit.

Remember, the goal of your CTA is to get the recipient to take action. By being specific and making it easy to respond, you increase the chances of a positive outcome.

For example, if you’re selling a software product, the CTA could be “Sign up for a free trial and see how our software can improve your workflow.” This CTA is specific and provides a clear next step, while also making it easy for the recipient to try out the product.

Another example is if you’re offering consulting services, the CTA could be “Reply with your top three business challenges and I’ll send you a free report with customized recommendations.” This CTA is specific and makes it easy for the recipient to respond by simply replying to the email.

Remember, your CTA should be tailored to your specific audience and value proposition. By following these best practices, you increase the chances of a positive response and ultimately, a successful sale.

Closing and Signature

Once you have written your sales introduction email, it’s important to end it on a professional note. The closing and signature of your email are essential components that should not be overlooked. Here are two important subsections that will help you end your email effectively.

Professional Sign-Off

Your email sign-off should be professional, yet friendly. It’s important to leave a positive impression on your potential client. Avoid using informal or overly casual language, such as “Cheers” or “Later.” Instead, opt for a more professional sign-off, such as “Best regards,” “Sincerely,” or “Thank you.”

Here are some examples of professional sign-offs that you can use:

  • Best regards,
  • Sincerely,
  • Thank you,
  • Respectfully,
  • Kind regards,
  • Warm regards,
  • All the best,

Contact Information

Your email signature should include your full name, title, and contact information. This makes it easy for your potential client to get in touch with you. You can also include links to your LinkedIn profiles, website, or blog.

Here’s an example of a professional email signature:

Best regards,

John Doe
Sales Representative
ABC Company
123 Main Street
Anytown, USA 12345
Phone: 555-555-5555
Email: john.doe@abccompany.com
Website: http://www.abccompany.com

The closing and signature of your sales introduction email are important components that should not be overlooked. By using a professional sign-off and including your contact information, you can leave a positive impression on your potential client and make it easy for them to get in touch with you.

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